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Kerstin Peters

It is all about art...

2014 Nov./Dec. Blog Entries

Giving the Gift of Art 3: Donating Your Art to Charity

 

"Red Tulips" was donated to the Christopher Leadership Course Ottawa and Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre silent auction during their "An Evening in a Secret Garden" fundraising gala, April 26, 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blog 45, November 28, 2014

 

I am sure that I am not the only one who receives more than the usual number of phone calls from charities asking for donations at this time of the year. While most ask for a monetary support, artists will also receive the occasional request for a donation of one of their art pieces for a charity auction.

 

There are many good charities that hold such events, and all of their causes are worthwhile, however, before you donate one of your artworks consider the following:

 

You often hear that donations of artworks for charity auctions do not only raise money for good causes but also offer great exposure to the artists supporting the cause. Unfortunately, this is usually not the case: The artwork is generally displayed among hundreds of other items, the artists are often not especially mentioned, or even invited to the event. Additionally, the auction often does not even raise the money the artist would normally ask for the painting resulting in a misconception about the value of the artwork. The art is basically bargained off which will only weaken your position in the art market.

 

If you donate an artwork to a charity, you cannot even deduct the price for tax purposes but only the cost of materials. On the other hand, the successful bidder could sell the artwork again and could deduct the full retail value. Your best option to support a charity would therefore be to give a monetary donation to support the cause. This way you are not helping to decrease art prices and have the same tax advantage as everyone else.

 

If you still decide to donate a piece of art to a charity, make sure you choose a recent painting at your regular price as your artwork should represent your current work.

 

To get a better result from the auction, set a minimum bid that ensures that the value of your work is respected. You could also ask for a share of the final sales price of the artwork.

 

You could also arrange or participate in a fundraising event where a certain percentage of the sales made will be donated to charity. As this would be a monetary donation, the artists would receive the same tax benefits as everyone else.

 

Ask the organizers if you can receive the contact information of the successful bidder, as well as the amount of the final bid for the piece. This way you can contact the purchaser with a “thank you” note to follow up the purchase. Also enquire about the way your artwork will be displayed, and whether you can leave business cards or brochures so that interested parties can follow up with you.

 

Donating art to charity is a completely personal decision. It is absolutely in your own discretion whether you want to support a cause by having your art auctioned off. If you decide to donate a piece of art to a charity that is close to your heart, give your donation because you believe in the cause, and not because for the tax deduction or exposure.

 

If you enjoyed this blog and would like to get more information about my art, I encourage you to sign up to my monthly newsletter on my website www.KerstinPeters.ca. The newsletter is published on the last Wednesday of every month. When subscribing, you will automatically receive my free eBook “I Am Ready To Paint But Where Do I Start?”.

 

If you know someone who might also like to read my blog, please share it. Thank you in advance for helping me to reach a bigger audience.

 

 

 


Giving the Gift of Art 2:

Does an Artwork Make a Good Gift?

 

 

Blog 44, November 21, 2014

 

 

In the spirit of the season, I wrote about buying art materials as Christmas gifts in last week's blog. This week, I will look at whether an artwork makes a good Christmas gift.

 

When we are considering which gifts to buy for our loved ones, we all want our presents to be received with true excitement. However, figuring out the perfect gift is sometimes quite difficult, even when we know the other person's interests. We want to avoid buying gifts that are unsuitable out of fear that the recipient will assume that we do not pay enough attention to his/her taste, as well as to his/her hobbies and lifestyle.

 

Keeping it safe, many people resort to giving gift cards because they can be used according to the recipient's taste. However, while gift cards are quite convenient, the are not very exciting gifts. If you buy a specific gift, you run the risk that it is not exactly what the person had in mind but if you get it right, the excitement and happiness will be authentic, and remembered for a long time.

 

Gifts like jewelry and art are very personal and show you put effort into the choice of the gift. Such a personal gift says a lot about you and how you see and value the other person. Art is not an exclusive gift for the rich. It does not have to be expensive. You can find very nice pieces from emerging artists at very reasonable prices, and the increasing number of online galleries make it easier to buy art in all price categories from the comfort of your home.

 

Before you buy an art piece, think about what your loved one likes. In the best case scenario is, you have witnessed that your family member or friend has seen something they love at an art show, in a gallery or online. Hopefully you picked up the artist's business card or name and the title of the work in question. Then, you just have to contact the artist or gallery to arrange the sale, and if necessary the delivery.

 

In case you know that your loved one admires art but do not know what type of art, you might consider visiting a museum together and observing his/her reactions. Especially, if you are buying something for a couple, it is important that both of them like a certain style of art.

 

It helps to consider the recipient's interests and hobbies. Does your family member or friend love pets, enjoy nature, or music?

 

A look around the recipient's home might also give you clues with respect to the art he/she likes, as well as to the style and colours present in the home.

 

With this information, you could go to a gallery or online gallery to look for art similar to the one your loved one admired in the museum or might be attracted to because of his/her interests. Once you decide to buy a certain painting, pay attention to the retailer's return policies.

 

If you buy an artwork on paper, make sure you have the work framed or at least include a gift certificate for framing so the recipient can enjoy the gift right away.

 

It is always a nice touch if you include a note that offers some explanations for your choice. Maybe, there is even a story behind the purchase of that particular painting, like a place you visited together or the fact that the painting reminded you of something in the other person's life.

 

If you are really unsure, it still might be best to get a gift certificate from a gallery or an artist. This way, your family member or friend can even decide to commission a work that is truly unique and personal.

 

Happy shopping!

 

If you enjoyed this blog and would like to get more information about my art, I encourage you to sign up to my monthly newsletter on my website www.KerstinPeters.ca. The newsletter is published on the last Wednesday of every month. When subscribing, you will automatically receive my free eBook “I Am Ready To Paint But Where Do I Start?”.

 

If you know someone who might also like to read my blog, please share it. Thank you in advance for helping me to reach a bigger audience.


 

 


Giving the Gift of Art 1:

Giving Art Materials to the Artist in Your Family


 

Blog 44, November 14, 2014

 

“It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas...” is the title of a beautiful Christmas song which is often used in all kinds of Christmas advertisements. It is the time of year, when most of us get anxious to find the perfect gifts for our loved ones. We are bombarded with flyers and email offers. Unfortunately, usually we only get a wish list from the little ones in the family, even though it seems to get harder and harder to get gifts for the mature adults in our midst who already seem to have everything.

 

If you have artists on your list of people to buy gifts for, don't go to an art store unprepared as the range of products will totally overwhelm you. Instead, start by looking around their work area, talk to them about materials they use, look at flyers together, or visit an art store with them before the holiday season. Pay attention to the materials they are talking about and admiring. If the artistic person in your life is taking a class or paints with friends, you could also ask the instructor or one of their artist buddies for advice. Once you are in the store, always choose the best quality you can afford, especially for your adolescent and adult artists. As you get what you pay for, avoid buying huge sets of cheap art equipment but get a small number of good quality material instead.

 

This does not mean that you cannot buy some items at the dollar store. Colouring books, and craft supplies are usually good deals, paints on the other hand often contain a lot of fillers so that they look rather dull and are frustrating to work with. However, I have seen Crayola crayons and markers at a couple of dollar stores which are quite reliable.

 

By buying art materials, you will give a gift that will provide hours of entertainment and increase creativity. Maybe, you even get inspired to try your hand at something creative. The possibilities are unlimited.

 

If you enjoyed this blog and would like to get more information about my art, I encourage you to sign up to my monthly newsletter on my website www.KerstinPeters.ca. The newsletter is published on the last Wednesday of every month. When subscribing, you will automatically receive my free eBook “I Am Ready To Paint But Where Do I Start?”.

 

If you know someone who might also like to read my blog, please share it. Thank you in advance for helping me to reach a bigger audience.

 

 

 

Peacefulness


 

Blog 43, November 7, 2014

 

In many countries, November starts out with many holidays remembering and celebrating the dead. It is a time of reflection and remembering the sacrifices many saints and soldiers made. In many countries, it is also a time to remember dead family members and to celebrate their lives.

 

Especially in catholic countries, all Saints' Day is celebrated on November 1 in honour of all the saints. All Souls' Day on the following day is a day of prayer for all dead.

 

While Germans observe the Sunday of the Dead (Eternity Sunday) to remember those who passed away with a “silent day”, meaning that in some regions of Germany music or dance events are prohibited, the Mexican Days of the Dead are a celebration of the lives of the departed. Family members and friends go to the gravesides to be with the souls of their deceased loved ones. They build private altars for the dead, bringing their favourite foods and beverages, as well as photos and mementoes to encourage visits by their souls. The celebrations are often humorous when funny events about the deceased are told.

 

Remembrance Day is observed in the Commonwealth countries since the end of World War I to remember the soldiers who have died in the line of duty. There are similar days in many countries outside of the Commonwealth.

 

There is no right or wrong way to remember and honour the dead. Often your country's or family's traditions will influence the way you treat death, and the remembrance of the deceased.

 

As November often brings us grey days, cold winds, and rainy or even snowy weather, I like to imagine myself at a peaceful spot like the one of my painting “Peacefulness” where I could sit on a bench absorbing the beauty of the sunset while reflecting on my life and remembering the happy moments with loved ones, both alive and dead.

 

Living abroad, in a country so far away from the place my grandparents are buried, I cannot visit their gravesides during the November holidays. Instead, I think about the memories, the happy hours I shared with them, especially with both my grandmothers. I know that those memories together with the mementoes received make my grandparents always are part of me.

 

The 16”x 20” acrylic painting shows a sunset at Petrie Island, one of the many I have painted. However, this is a painting of the almost set sun. The colours are much more subdued. There are no bright oranges, reds, and yellows. The beautiful blues and purples create an atmosphere of peace. It feels like the right place to meditate and just be in the moment, to be quiet, and thankful.

 

If you enjoyed this blog and would like to get more information about my art, I encourage you to sign up to my monthly newsletter on my website www.KerstinPeters.ca. The newsletter is published on the last Wednesday of every month. When subscribing, you will automatically receive my free eBook “I Am Ready To Paint But Where Do I Start?”.

 

If you know someone who might also like to read my blog, please share it. Thank you in advance for helping me to reach a bigger audience.

 

 


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